Creating ROI with cross-media/platform campaigns

Cross-platform confusion

The proliferation and growth of various advertising platforms and customer touchpoints over the last several years can often leave marketers scratching their heads when attempting to determine which ones to use. Whether they need to focus solely on one above the rest or spread their investment is a pressing question. In addition, integration of platform campaigns can become inhibited by confusion over what works and doesn’t, meaning teams can become quite siloed, compounding difficulties. But a little while ago, the Advertising Research Foundation put together an excellent study on the matter and it’s one we think you’ll find useful. We’ve summarised a few key points below.

 

Why cross-platform at all?

Research suggests that integrating across several platforms and media can prove very worthwhile for brands. According to the study, when advertisers move from using one platform for campaigns to two, an incremental increase of 19% in ROI is achieved. And the more platforms that are added, the better the results, with the use of 5 platforms generating an uplift of 35%. A big reward for smart integration across a variety of potential touchpoints and experiences for the customer.

 

Multiple creatives needed? No!

Part of the problem when marketing teams begin to consider their adoption of a  cross-platform advertising strategy is that they may not be sure whether splitting creative approaches across various media is the right way to go, or if they should adopt similar creatives throughout. The answer, according to the study, is the latter. A unified approach, message and ‘feel’ results in better campaign performance and a 57% uptick in brand-equity metrics. This makes sense as multiple creatives, all different, across several channels may only end up confusing the customer. Where creative is concerned, consistency is vital.

 

Most effective type of cross-platform?

The study also looked at which platform combinations could prove most effective at providing increased ROI for marketers. On the whole, fusing traditional media and digital was found to be most potent. While partnering radio & TV together provided an uplift, with the same for print & TV, it was the combination of TV & online campaigns that came out on top – with a lift in ROI of +60% on TV alone (what the ARF referred to as the ‘Kicker Effect’). When consideration is made, this makes real sense. TV can be seen as the perfect medium for ‘priming’ customers emotionally, making them ready to take action. And online campaigns are made for conversion. It’s a match made in heaven.

 

Cross-platform clarity

In summary then – yes, of course cross-platform should be the cornerstone of your advertising strategy. Customers engage across a variety of media, channels and platforms. Integrating these in a cohesive manner when brand-building has proven the best way to reach out. And while this means a lot of tools at a marketer’s disposal, there’s no need to be confused about it. The right creative or message across several combinations of platforms is likely to work to your advantage and, while digital continues to grow in importance, traditional media (in particular the old favorite that is TV) backs it up beautifully.

TVadSync & Unacast partner up to give advertisers clear insight into the effect of TV+Digital on footfall

We’re delighted to announce that we’ve teamed up with Unacast, the leading location data platform, in order to offer advertisers and media teams total clarity into how cross-platform TV-to-digital campaigns drive location and store visits. Read the news here.

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Privacy and TV ACR

What is TV ACR and why is privacy an issue?

Until recently, TV wasn’t as measurable a medium as advertisers and broadcasters would like. Quantifying the effect of TV campaigns on subsequent viewer behaviour was never easy, and extremely reliant on limited panels for feedback. Now, however, things have changed. With automated content-recognition (ACR) technology being built into more and more Smart TVs, said TVs recognizing what they are showing and an ever-expanding amount of viewing data being produced, it’s easier than ever before to understand viewership and quantify the effects that brands’ advertising has on their customers. But as is always the case where new avenues of data collection begin to open, making sure viewers’ privacy and rights are fully respected remains absolutely paramount.

FTC compliance

The Federal Trade Commission hasn’t been resting on its laurels either, and has taken the initiative on protecting users’ data and their right to opt in or out of its use. In February 2017, the FTC issued a new set of compliance standards that collectors of TV ACR data must adhere to. In essence, the new criteria ensure that all vendors engaged in data-collection must make it plainly known to TV viewers, as well as offer them an explicit option to opt out of having their data collected and used for advertising or audience targeting. Brands must remain totally aware of whether the vendors they work with are in compliance with such standards. If they aren’t, there exists the possibility that the FTC could require manufacturers engaged in data collection to cease doing so. If non-compliance goes public, very much a risk, the brand themselves may be left with extremely troublesome and expensive PR damage to deal with.

Listening apps

The standards mean compliant, leading TV OEMs, like Vizio and their subsidiary Inscape for example, can busy themselves collecting data from viewers who have opted into allowing their behaviour to be measured this way. However, there are still other providers of differing types of TV ACR data that may yet fall under the eye of the FTC. Vendors who collect data via audio-based identification of TV content could be an example. Rather than working with TVs that recognize themselves what they are showing, these vendors use apps to listen in to try to identify what a TV in near-proximity is showing. Apart from often requiring the app to be in use while the TV is showing specific content (meaning perfect timing is required for this approach to be of any use), this type of data collection has increasingly come under focus for what has been deemed an almost surreptitious way to collect data on TV viewers. If pressure and bad publicity follows, the FTC may act to curtail this approach.

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